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CMS Announces July 2015 Transition from IACS to EIDM

CMS 

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) would like to inform Physician Quality Reporting System (PQRS) participants and their staff to an important system update scheduled to be in place on July 13, 2015.


The Individuals Authorized Access to CMS Computer Services (IACS) system will be retired, but current IACS user accounts will transition to an existing CMS system called Enterprise Identity Management (EIDM). The EIDM system provides a way for business partners to apply for, obtain approval, and receive a single user ID for accessing multiple CMS applications.


Existing PQRS IACS users, their data, and roles will be moved to EIDM and will be accessible from the ‘PQRS Portal’ portion of the CMS Enterprise Portal at  http://portal.cms.gov. Users will then access the PQRS Portal to submit data, retrieve submission reports, view feedback reports, or conduct various administrative and maintenance activities. New PQRS users will need to register for an EIDM account.


Stay tuned for more information and resources in the coming weeks and months! In the meantime, please ensure that your IACS account is active, current, and you’re able to log in. This will help ensure a smoother transition to EIDM.


For additional assistance regarding IACS or EIDM, contact the QualityNet Help Desk at 1-866-288-8912 (TTY 1-877-715-6222) from 7:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. Central Time Monday through Friday, or via email at qnetsupport@hcqis.org. To avoid security violations, do not include personal identifying information, such as Social Security Number or TIN, in email inquiries to the QualityNet Help Desk.

CMS Announces Extension for EPs participating in PQRS via EHR and QCDR (QRDA III format)

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) is pleased to announce that the submission deadlines for the PQRS reporting methods below have been extended.  All other submission timeframes for other PQRS reporting methods remain the same.  The revised submission timeframes are:

Reporting Method Submission Period Submission Deadline Time

(All Times are Eastern)

EHR Direct or Data Submission Vendor that is certified EHR technology (CEHRT) 1/1/15 – 3/20/15 8:00 p.m.
Qualified clinical data registries (QCDRs) (using QRDA III format) reporting for PQRS and the clinical quality measure (CQM) component of meaningful use for the Medicare Electronic Health Record (EHR) Incentive Program 1/1/15 – 3/20/15 8:00 p.m.

An Individuals Authorized Access to CMS Computer Services (IACS) account with the “PQRS Submitter Role” is required for these PQRS data submission methods. Please see the IACS Quick Reference Guides for specifics.

PQRS provides an incentive payment to individual eligible professionals (EPs) and group practices that satisfactorily participate or satisfactorily report data on quality measures for covered Medicare Physician Fee Schedule (PFS) services. Additionally, those who do not meet the 2014 PQRS reporting requirements will be subject to a negative payment adjustment on all Medicare Part B PFS services rendered in 2016.

Note:  The deadline listed above does apply to Individual Eligible Professionals and Group Practices participating in other CMS programs such as the Medicare EHR Incentive Program and Comprehensive Primary Care Initiative that are utilizing the reporting methods listed above. Additionally, CMS has extended the deadline for EPs wishing to attest to meaningful use for the EHR reporting period in 2014 for the Medicare Electronic Health Record (EHR) Incentive Program to March 20, 2015. Please be on the lookout for a separate listserv with information regarding the attestation extension.

For questions, please contact the QualityNet Help Desk 1-866-288-8912 or via email at Qnetsupport@hcqis.org from 7:00 a.m. – 7:00 p.m. Central Time. Complete information about PQRS is available at  http://www.cms.gov/Medicare/Quality-Initiatives-Patient-Assessment-Instruments/PQRS/index.html.

Other changes for 2014

sunriselogo2009With all the chatter going on with ICD-10, I thought it appropriate to write something that doesn’t revolve around ICD-10.  There are changes in Meaningful Use stage 1, and new criteria for Stage 2 Meaningful Use, Clinical Quality Measures and PQRS.  Happy reading!

If you have attested for at least 2 years for stage 1 meaningful use, then stage 2 is next on the docket for your practice. If you have attested once for stage 1 then all those things you attested to before now will change this year. Stage 1 requirements change in 2014 as well as Stage 2 Meaningful Use objectives for those of you who have successfully completed two years of Stage 1.

 Let’s first tackle those changes in 2014 to Stage one Meaningful Use:
1. Electronic Health Record (EHR) software systems have to re-certify their product to meet new regulations for 2014. Right now your current EHR has undergone the certification process for 2014 and will be available early spring of 2014.
2. For those of you that plan on doing stage 1 in 2014, certain “core” and “menu” objectives have been removed/combined and you can no longer count measure exclusions toward meeting menu objectives. You will have to meet 5 of the 9 menu items and 13 (as opposed to 15 in previous years) core objectives.
3. Clinical Quality Measure reporting will change as well. You will have to report on 9 and those 9 need to cover at least 3 of the 6 National Quality Strategy Domains. I’ve explained more later on.
4. Reporting is done in one calendar quarter, as opposed to 90 consecutive days previously (for example, April 1 2014- June 30, 2014). Rules for Medicaid incentive have not changed for 2014 so you can report for any continuous 90 days under Medicaid.
5. This is the last year you are eligible to begin to get incentive payments. If you are planning to start your first year this year you can still earn as much as $24,000 in incentives. AND your meaningful use performance in 2014 will be the basis for 2016 payment adjustments.
6. CPOE Denominator changes-now required (you will not be able to exclude from this measure).
7. Vital sign age limit is 3 years and older (changed from 2 years and older) for blood pressure and no age limit on height and weight. Since BP is separate, you can exclude from the BP measure.
8. The old stage 1 requirement for providing patients with an electronic copy of their health information upon request will be changed in 2014 to “Provide patients the ability to view online, download and transmit their health information within 4 business days of the information being available to the EP”.
9. The old stage 1 requirement for providing patients timely electronic access to their health information within 4 business days will be changed in 2014 to “More than 50 percent of all unique patients seen by the EP during the EHR reporting period are provided timely (within 4 business days after the information is available to the EP) online access to their health information subject to the EP’s discretion to withhold certain information”.

Moving on to what is next with Stage 2 Meaningful Use.

Stage 2 retains the same basic structure as Stage 1; however, all those Menu items in stage 1 become CORE items for Stage 2 with higher thresholds that you must achieve. There are also some new Stage 2 core and menu objectives.

STAGE 1

STAGE 2

 

13 Core Objectives 17 Core Objectives
5 of 10 Menu Objectives + 3 of 6 Menu Objectives
18 total objectives 20 total objectives

+CQM’S

=STAGE 2 MEANINGFUL USE

What are the requirements?
17 Core Objectives – These are objectives that everyone who participates in Stage 2 must meet. Some of the core objectives have exclusions, but many do not.
3 of 6 Menu Objectives – You only have to report on 3 out of the 6 available menu objectives for Stage 2. You can choose objectives that make sense for your workflow or practice. Again, some of these objectives have exclusions.

The following is a list of the Stage 2 Meaningful Use 17 Core Objectives
1. Use computerized provider order entry (CPOE) for medication, laboratory and radiology orders
2. Generate and transmit permissible prescriptions electronically (eRx)
3. Record demographic information
4. Record and chart changes in vital signs
5. Record smoking status for patients 13 years old or older
6. Use clinical decision support to improve performance on high-priority health conditions
7. Provide patients the ability to view online, download and transmit their health information
8. Provide clinical summaries for patients for each office visit
9. Protect electronic health information created or maintained by Certified EHR Technology
10. Incorporate clinical lab-test results into Certified EHR Technology
11. Generate lists of patients by specific conditions to use for quality improvement, reduction of disparities, research, or outreach
12. Use clinically relevant information to identify patients who should receive reminders for preventive/follow-up care
13. Use certified EHR technology to identify patient-specific education resources
14. Perform medication reconciliation
15. Provide summary of care record for each transition of care or referral
16. Submit electronic data to immunization registries
17. Use secure electronic messaging to communicate with patients on relevant health information
In addition to the 17 core objectives, there are 6 Menu Objectives (and remember, you’ll only have to do 3 of the 6).
1. Submit electronic syndromic surveillance data to public health agencies ($-for the additional interface)
2. Record electronic notes in patient records
3. Imaging results accessible through CEHRT
4. Record patient family health history
5. Report cancer cases to a public health central cancer registry
6. Report specific cases to a specialized registry
Important Note: While there are exclusions provided for some of these menu objectives, you cannot select a menu objective and claim the exclusion if there are other menu objectives that you could report on instead.

Changes to Clinical Quality Measures
Beginning in 2014, the reporting of clinical quality measures (CQMs) will change for all providers.
You have the option of submitting three months of CQM data online through the CMS Registration & Attestation System. This will be the same website you go to for attestation now.
You also have the option to submit a full year of data electronically using the QRDA format to receive credit for the EHR Incentive Program and the Physician Quality Reporting System.
Please note that your attestation for the Medicare EHR Incentive Program is not complete until you submit clinical quality measure data, so your EHR incentive payment will be held until your electronic submission is processed.
If you are a provider using Medicaid, you must submit your clinical quality measurement data to your State Medicaid Agency.
How to Select CQM’s in 2014
Beginning in 2014, eligible professionals must select and report on 9 of a possible list of 64 approved CQMs for the EHR Incentive Programs.
There is also a new requirement in 2014 that the quality measures selected must cover at least 3 of the 6 available National Quality Strategy (NQS) domains, which represent the Department of Health and Human Services’ NQS priorities for health care quality improvement. The 6 domains are:
• Patient and Family Engagement
• Patient Safety
• Care Coordination
• Population and Public Health
• Efficient Use of Health Care Resources
• Clinical Processes/Effectiveness
In short there are a lot of changes this year in addition to ICD-10 implementation.

Stay tuned….

Sunrise Services, LLC

 

How to Prepare For, Survive an EHR Meaningful Use Audit

Posted from AAFP News Now:

Use of the words “audit” and “Medicare” in the same sentence tend to make even the most seasoned physician uncomfortable. So when the news broke in March that CMS had added prepayment meaningful use (MU) audits to its ongoing postpayment audit process, some family physicians expressed concern.

Understanding that a little knowledge can go a long way toward alleviating anxiety, AAFP News Now recently spoke with a government expert about how physicians can prepare for MU audits associated with the Medicare Electronic Health Records (EHR) Incentive Program.

Rob Anthony, deputy director of the Health IT Initiatives Group for CMS’ Office of E-Health Standards and Services, noted that as many as 10 percent of program participants would face an audit. “Keep in mind that the audits are both random and targeted,” said Anthony, so physicians shouldn’t assume they’ve made an error if they receive an e-mail audit notification from Figliozzi and Co., the certified public accountant firm selected by CMS to conduct the audits.

“We’re required to do due diligence on our end,” said Anthony, and that includes robust oversight of a government program that disperses taxpayer dollars in the form of physician bonuses that can total as much as $18,000. According to Anthony, the audit process is the same regardless of whether physicians are notified before or after they are issued a check for successfully meeting MU program requirements.

“The first thing we always tell people is that if you’ve entered accurate numbers (in the MU attestation process) and have the documentation to support that, then the audit is a really simple process for this program. You’re simply showing (auditors) supporting documentation,” said Anthony.

For the vast majority of people, the primary support document is the report generated by a certified EHR because it generally provides both the numerator and denominator values needed for MU attestation.

“It’s important to make sure the report specifies a time period and indicates that it is specific to you as a provider,” said Anthony. That’s as easy as including a National Provider Identifier, provider name or practice name.

Anthony noted that some certified EHRs provide a “snapshot in time,” meaning that the physician can go back to any 90-day period, and the system always shows the correct numerator and denominator values for that period. However, many EHRs don’t have that function and instead use what Anthony called a “rolling system” that changes the values of the numerators and denominators after the reporting period ends.

In that situation, he advised physicians to “save either a paper or an electronic copy of the report you used to attest so that when an auditor comes knocking and asking for supporting documentation, you can hand him a report that shows the numerator and denominator values that you entered (for attestation) rather than something that might have changed later down the line.”

A number of physicians also have had trouble complying with what Anthony called the “yes/no functionality issues” that require specific EHR functions — such as drug allergy interaction checks and clinical decision support — to be turned on during the entire reporting period.

“Some systems have an audit log that shows that you have functionality enabled for the entire reporting time, but many systems don’t,” said Anthony. If your system doesn’t, save one or more screen shots that are dated from the reporting period to which you are attesting.

One additional area that has snagged numerous physicians is the security risk analysis. “This doesn’t impose any additional requirements beyond what’s already required for a security risk analysis for your practice as part of HIPAA (the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act),” said Anthony. “The only difference is that we require it more frequently,” or every year for MU versus every two years for HIPAA purposes.

Anthony warned that a “generalized” security risk analysis wouldn’t meet the MU audit requirement. “You need something that shows it (an analysis) was done before the end of the reporting period and that shows it is specific to your certified EHR and your particular practice. Information that is dated and specific to you goes a long way for a lot of these requirements.”

Lastly, Anthony advised physicians to direct any audit questions to Figliozzi and Co., including requests for clarification about requested documents as well as requests for additional time to comply.

Anthony summed up how to make the audit process go smoothly: “If you’ve input the numbers correctly and accurately, and you have the documentation to show how you got there, the audit process is simple. You’re not generating new information.”

Additional resources can be found by clicking the following links:

CMS: EHR Incentive Program Supporting Documentation for Audits

CMS: Audit Overview Fact Sheet

CMS: Sample Audit Request Letter

 

 

Deadline for avoiding e-prescribing penalty is fast approaching.

The 2% penalty is the punitive side of a federal program designed to motivate physicians and other clinicians to replace their prescription pads with iPads, smart phones, and the like. In 2010, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) began paying bonuses to clinicians who e-prescribe for their Medicare patients. The bonus that year was 2% of a clinician’s Medicare reimbursement. In 2013, the final year for these incentive payments, the bonus is 0.5%.

Last year, Medicare began penalizing clinicians who had not previously qualified as “successful electronic prescribers,” in CMS parlance, or electronically transmitted at least 10 scripts for Medicare patients in the first half of the 2011. That number of e-prescriptions, reported to CMS through G codes on Medicare claims, is not enough to earn a bonus, but it staves off the penalty, which was 1% in 2012. The penalty disappears after 2014.

Clinicians will be exempt from the 2% penalty in 2014 if they:

  • qualified for an e-prescribing bonus during 2012;
  • did not have at least 100 Medicare claims in the first 6 months of 2013 with 1 of the 50-plus billing codes that must be associated with an e-prescription for it to count toward the bonus;
  • did not generate 10% or more of their Medicare allowable charges in the first 6 months of 2013 with the required billing codes;
  • were not a physician, podiatrist, nurse practitioner, or physician assistant as of June 30;
  • achieved “meaningful use” under the Medicare or Medicaid incentive programs for electronic health record (EHR) systems in either 2012 or the first 6 months of 2013, and reported that to CMS by June 30, 2013;
  • registered to participate in one of the EHR incentive programs by June 30 and adopted certified EHR technology; or
  • Lacked prescribing privileges and indicated that with code G8644 at least once on a Medicare claim before June 30.

Clinicians also can apply for one of several hardship exemptions, which include practicing in a rural area without sufficient high-speed Internet access and being barred by local, state, or federal law from e-prescribing. The deadline for a hardship exemption application, accomplished with a G code on a Medicare claim, is June 30.”

More information about avoiding the Medicare e-prescribing penalty is available on the CMS Web site, or feel free to give us a call-888-880-0384

sunriselogo2009

PQRS..more than just letters in the alphabet!

In all the whorl wind of Meaningful Use Stages one and two, e-RX incentives (or penalties), ICD-10 implementation, there’s another “oldie but goodie” program for providers to participate in.  The program has been around for a few years, but did you know come 2015, you may be subject to another penalty (on top of everything else) for not participating in this program?

According to CMS- The Physician Quality Reporting System (PQRS) is a reporting program that uses a combination of incentive payments and payment adjustments to promote reporting of quality information by eligible professionals. Beginning in 2015, the program also applies a payment adjustment to eligible professionals who do not satisfactorily report data on quality measures for covered professional services.

Planning to participate in 2013?  Here are some things you should know:

  • To earn the 2013 PQRS incentive payment and avoid the 2015 PQRS payment adjustment you need to collect your data from January 1 through December 31 of this year.
  • Decide if you are going to report through your EHR (you may have to discuss with your vendor if you can report through your EHR), or if you are going to report your measure on claims.
  • Become very familiar with the CMS website- http://www.cms.gov/Medicare/Quality-Initiatives-Patient-Assessment-Instruments/PQRS
  • Report on each eligible claim
  • Avoid including multiple dates of service and/or multiple rendering providers on the same claim – this will help eliminate diagnosis codes associated with other services being attributed to another provider’s services
  • For measures that require more than one code, ensure that all codes are captured on the claim
  • If your claim with the reporting codes on it was denied for payment the PQRS codes will not be included in the program analysis.
  • Check you remittance advice for remark code N365, which reads “This procedure code is not payable. It is for reporting/information purposes only.”
  • Review all diagnoses (if applicable) and CPT Service (encounter) codes for denominator inclusion in PQRS/eRx (i.e., claims that are denominator-eligible).

Participation this year in the program could earn you incentives of up to 1%.  Failure to report could land you a whopping 1.5% pay cut (in addition to all those other penalties from CMS).

Need to learn more?  Visit us on the web at www.sunrize.com.  CMS also has a new eHealth Website that has some useful information as well- http://www.cms.gov/ehealth.

Seven Value Propositions for Practice Choice

7 Value Propositions of McKesson Practice Choice

Image

1.      Lowers Cost of traditional EHR/PM Technology ·
         Avoid costly servers and IT staffing using a Web-based solution
         Learn, setup, & maintain one integrated solution
         Practice Management
         Health Records
         Patient Portal
         e-Prescribing
         Claims Engine including ERA, Electronic Eligibility Checking & Relay Health EDI.
         Low-hassle rolling upgrades always keeps your practice current and compliant
         Automatic backups & security
2.    Is Intuitive, Designed for the Small Independent Medical Office
         Be at ease with McKesson – a leading healthcare company that’s been in the EHR space for over 20 years
         Be confident in an built-from-the-ground up investment using Microsoft’s latest technology stack designed specifically for the independent practice
         Be efficient with our multiple role layout. We studied this space specifically, and laid out the software considerate of the many hats you wear during the day
         Learn easily and train new staff with integrated training videos, guides, and online help.
        Share best practices online chatting with other Choice practices like your own
3.       Protects Cash Flow
         Check patient eligibility real-time to guarantee reimbursement
         Ensure recommended procedures are performed to benefit patient health and encourage visit volume
         Improve collections by taking visit and account payments at check-in
         Embedded Claim/ERA services with auto-posting keeps cash moving
4.    Helps you Go Electronic without compromising Patient Care
         Avoid excessive clicking with single screen documentation that mimics paper
         Smart Notes design enables clinicians to pull and push data from the chart while you build the note
         Gain efficiency using natural terminology to search codes
         Care for patients with a powerful cross sectional chart summary
5.       Creates New Efficiencies with Technology
         Make patient care simpler via electronic prescriptions with clever interaction checking
         Maximize reimbursement with insurance-preferred labs automating when creating an order
         Save time eliminating paper lab results via an electronic connection
6.    Enhances Patient Touch
         Supplement patient-provider interaction with electronic messaging
         Give patients and their providers a consolidated health summary in-hand or electronically
         Quickly manage refill requests online
         Keep patients informed via patient education material summaries
7.       Gains Visibility to the Health of your Patient and Practice
         Speedily generate patient lists and reminders to communicate with the right audience
         Benchmark yourself against Meaningful Use performance and clinical quality measures
         Interrogate your financial health with comprehensive report generation

For additional information please visit our website at www.sunrize.com or call 502-538-4665.

Mandated Sequestration Payment Reductions Beginning for Medicare EHR Incentive Program

Incentive payments made through the Medicare Electronic Health Record (EHR) Incentive Program are subject to the mandatory reductions in federal spending known as sequestration, required by the Budget Control Act of 2011.

Incentive Payment Reduction

The American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012 postponed sequestration for two

months. As required by law, President Obama issued a sequestration order on March 1, 2013. Under these mandatory reductions, Medicare EHR incentive

payments made to eligible professionals and eligible hospitals will be reduced by 2%.

Reduction Timing

This 2% reduction will be applied to any Medicare EHR incentive payment for a reporting period that ends on or after April 1, 2013. If the final day of the reporting period occurs before April 1, 2013, those incentive payments will not be subject to the reduction.

Please note: This reduction does not apply to Medicaid EHR incentive payments, which are exempt from the mandatory reductions.

Want more information about the EHR Incentive Programs?
Make sure to visit the EHR Incentive Programs website for the latest news and updates on the EHR Incentive Programs.

http://www.sunrize.com

Be prepared for changes to stage 1 meaningful use!

There are some changes coming in 2014 for all those meaningful users still in stage one.   While some of these changes are positive, there are a few that may come as a surprise-especially if a practice attested for the first time in 2013, and plan to do the second year of stage one in 2014.  Here are just a few things to be aware of:

  1. You can no longer count an exclusion toward the minimum 5 menu objectives.  In other words-there are 10 to choose from and a provider must be able to attest to 5 of those with no exclusions.
  2. Seeing patients ages 3 and over? You have to record blood pressure, height and weight on more than 50% of patients.  An EP can exclude his or herself, though if there is no relevance to the scope of practice.
  3. The capability to exchange key clinical information among providers of care and patient authorized entities electronically is no longer required starting in 2013.
  4. Providing patients with timely access to their health information within 4 business days has been changed in 2014 to being able to provide patients the ability to view online, download and transmit their health information within 4 business days of the information being available to the EP.  This will have to be reported for more than 50% of all unique patients.
  5. LOTS of changes with Clinical Quality Measures (CQM).  Prior to 2014, providers have 44 measures to choose from in which they had to report 6 total (3 core and 3 alternate).  Starting in 2014 and beyond a provider must report 9 measures (out of a total of 64).  Selected CQM’s must cover at least 3 of the National Quality Strategy domains.  For more information please refer to www.cms.gov/EHRincentiveprograms.

Providers who were early demonstrators of meaningful use in 2011 will meet three consecutive years of meaningful use under the Stage 1 criteria before advancing to the Stage 2 criteria in 2014.  All other providers would meet two years of meaningful use under the Stage 1 criteria before advancing to the Stage 2 criteria in the third year.  This is regardless of the year you started to participate.

Looking forward to stage 2 of meaningful use?  Although you can’t begin to collect data for stage 2 meaningful use until 2014, there are a couple of things to have in place ideally before 2014.

The first thing is to establish a patient portal and become familiar with the workings of the portal.  Work out any changes to your workflow in order to become successful in establishing protocols for staff and for patients.  Make sure to give yourself plenty of time for marketing.

Another item for action would be to get with your lab (if you haven’t already done so), and make sure your EHR has a way to incorporate lab results as structured data.  This menu objective for stage 1 becomes a core objective for stage 2.  Creating this “bridge”, can take some time to do so the sooner the better.  Some labs are more backlogged than others and this could very well take up to 6 months to complete.

Any questions?  We’d be happy to help visit our website- www.sunrize.com or email me-  Kelly@sunrize.com.

Practice Choice EHR

 

McKesson Practice Choice Web Image - Product Name (Color)

 

McKesson Practice Choice™ is a cost-effective Web-based electronic health record (EHR) and practice management (PM) solution inspired by small, physician practices just like yours.   Intuitive and efficient, McKesson Practice Choice does more than maintain records and protect cash flow; it has the power to improve the quality of your patient interactions.
When care is your priority and simplicity is your choice

With 20+ years developing PM and EHR technologies, McKesson understands the juggling act of the small, physician practice, and is committed to utilizing technology to make your life easier, flexible and more efficient. That’s why McKesson Practice Choice is more than an EHR product — it’s a comprehensive, full-practice solution.
Utilizing a SaaS (Software as a Service) model, McKesson Practice Choice allows physician practices to exchange data with other practices, patients, HIEs, hospitals, pharmacies, labs and payers. These connections help to streamline care coordination, to enhance patient care, and to position your practice for the future direction of healthcare.
One solution for your entire office

Simplify your administrative overhead and learning curve with just a single solution: choicepic

• Electronic Health Record (EHR)
• Practice Management (PM)
• Patient Portals
• Patient Health Maintenance Tracking
• e-Prescribing
• Claims Management

One Choice for Connecting Providers, Payers and Patients

Progress Notechoice2 Featuring Smart Note Technology

Spend less time charting and more time interacting with your patients, as everything you enter automatically flows data into all pertinent fields throughout a chart.

• Document on a single screen while pulling and pushing
data from anywhere in the patient’s chart.
• Search codes using natural terminology and view
cross-sectional chart summaries.
• Create a template that suits your note-taking preferences

Billing and Schedulingchoice3

Utilizing intuitive drag and drop technology and simple organiza

tio

n,

McKesson Practice Choice brings needed efficiencies to a busy front office.


Meaningful Use Dashboard and Reporting

From a single screen, gauge your progress in real time for both core and selected requirements, and gain an instant view of your practice’s performance. Also, customizable controls allow you to observe detailed performance levels of every member of your practice.

Need more information?  Call us at 888-880-0384 or visit us on the web at http://www.sunrize.com.